Western Australia

Weed legislation contact

Mr Rod Randall
Invasive Species Science
Dept of Agriculture and Food Western Australia
100 Bougainvillea Avenue
FORRESTFIELD WA 6058

Ph. (08) 9366 2338
Fax. (08) 9366 2342

Email: rod.randall@agric.wa.gov.au


Relevant legislation

Western Australia’s defences against potentially devastating pests and diseases were strengthened with the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 (BAM Act) coming into effect on 1st May 2013.

Under the Act “weeds” are classified as “pests”.

What the BAM Act does

The Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act and associated regulations were enacted on 1 May 2013. The new BAM Act replaces 16 older Acts and 27 sets of regulations with one Act and nine sets of regulations and enhances protection of the state’s $6 billion agriculture and food sector and the environment.

The main purposes of the BAM Act and its regulations are to:

  • Prevent new animal and plant pests (vermin and weeds) and diseases from entering Western Australia.
  • Manage the impact and spread of those pests already present in the state.
  • Safely manage the use of agricultural and veterinary chemicals.
  • Increased control over the sale of agricultural products that contain violative chemical residues.

Under the BAM Act the guidelines for biosecurity extend from border to post-border. New penalties can be issued by Quarantine WA to persons who contravene the regulations regarding importing potentially harmful organisms or carriers of such organisms.

Industry and community involvement

The involvement of the whole community has also been facilitated under the BAM Act. In both pastoral and agricultural areas, groups who are tackling established declared pests which impact on the public as well as private interests may now be formally acknowledged as Recognised Biosecurity Groups (RBGs) by the Minister.

Extracts

Declared plants.

To protect Western Australian agriculture the Department of Agriculture and Food, Western Australia regulates harmful plants under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007.

Plants that are prevented entry into the State or have control or keeping requirements within the State are known as declared pests.

The Western Australian Organism List (WAOL) contains information on the area(s) in which a plant is declared and the control and keeping categories to which it has been assigned in Western Australia.

If you need advice on declared plants contact the Pest and Disease Information Service (PaDIS).

Organisms are grouped into four main classifications:

  • Declared pests (section 22)
  • Permitted (section 11)
  • Prohibited (section 12)
  • Permitted requiring a permit (73, BAM Regulations 2013).

Declared plants.

Under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act all declared pests are placed in one of three categories, namely C1 (exclusion), C2 (eradication) or C3 (management).

The C1 category (Exclusion) — Pests are assigned to this category if they are not established in Western Australia and control measures are to be taken, including border checks, in order to prevent them entering and establishing in the State.

The C2 category (Eradication) — Pests are assigned to this category if they are present in Western Australia in low enough numbers or in sufficiently limited areas that their eradication is still feasible.

The C3 category (Management) — Pests are assigned to this category if they are established in Western Australia but it is feasible, or desirable, to manage them in order to limit their damage. Control measures can prevent a C3 pest from increasing in population size or density or moving from an area in which it is established into an area which currently is free of that pest.

Organisms that are unlisted are those that have not been declared by the Minister for Agriculture and Food as permitted, prohibited or declared pests, and therefore are not included on the Western Australian Organism List (WAOL). Section 15(2) states unlisted organisms cannot be imported, except with a permit. This provision requires therefore that people must seek permission to bring unlisted organisms across the border into Western Australia so that an assessment can be made about any biosecurity threats they may pose to the State.

Pest plants.

Under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007, local government authorities can prescribe any plant, other than a declared plant, to be a pest plant.

It is each local government authority’s responsibility to schedule a plant for pest plant status and administer the pest plant sections of the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 in respect of that plant.

The Department of Agriculture and Food provides advice on how to prescribe a pest plant.

Contact your local government authority or search the Department of Local Government’s Local Law register for advice on pest plants in local government areas.

Western Australian Organism List (WAOL)

Use the Western Australian Organism List (WAOL) (https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/organisms) to find out the status of organisms which are categorised under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 (BAM Act).

Key

Western Australia uses organisms are grouped into four main classifications:

  • Declared pests (section 22)
  • Permitted (section 11)
  • Prohibited (section 12)
  • Permitted requiring a permit (73, BAM Regulations 2013).

Only prohibited pest plants listed as noxious or declared weeds by another State/Territory and not declared in WA have been included in this database. Species not included in the Declared, Permitted and Prohibited lists require a permit which requires a weed risk assessment before being allowed entry into WA.

Category  
Check WA provides an interactive database, the Western Australian Organism List (WAOL) (https://www.agric.wa.gov.au/organisms) which should be consulted to find out the status of organisms which are categorised under the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 (BAM Act).
Declared weed species listed in the Biosecurity and Agriculture Management Act 2007 only
C1 category (Exclusion) Pests are assigned to this category if they are not established in Western Australia and control measures are to be taken, including border checks, in order to prevent them entering and establishing in the State.
C2 category (Eradication) Pests are assigned to this category if they are present in Western Australia in low enough numbers or in sufficiently limited areas that their eradication is still feasible.
C3 category (Management) Pests are assigned to this category if they are established in Western Australia but it is feasible, or desirable, to manage them in order to limit their damage.
Pest Plants are not included in the database.